By the Book: The Gospel of John 1:1-3

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was with God in the beginning, all things were created through Him, and apart from Him not one thing was created that has been created

So, I chose the gospel of John to begin my first series of By the Book meditations. These are my personal reflections and I am not a biblical scholar. I’ll do my best to steer away from heresy. (That was a joke. Though I really am going to try to not be a heretic.) 
Every time I am going to read from the Bible for this series (and all of the By the Book meditations), I am going to use a lectio divinia meditation practice. (Thanks to my brother, Jacob, for teaching it to me). Even the point of lectio is not biblical scholarship, but to pray through a text to seek God. I encourage you to do the same with me. 

Lectio Divina

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was with God in the beginning, all things were created through Him, and apart from Him not one thing was created that has been created

1) Read the text slowly, without making any conscious decisions about it. 

2) Meditate on what the text has for you as you read it a second time. 

3. Pray to God about your thoughts as you read the text for the third and final time. Your understandings and your misunderstandings are both welcome. Is God calling you to action?

4) Contemplate silently for a time, focusing on God’s love. 

My Meditation

This is our origin myth in short form. As Tolkien famously told Lewis, there are myths which are true. This, along with Genesis, is where we find that our God stood outside time and our understanding of reality and created us. 

I cannot help but think of atheists reading this passage: Isn’t this circular logic? The Bible is right because it says that the Bible is right? Yes. And no. (As the answers to most things are.) When we are asked questions by children, do we cite our sources? Usually not. We tell them our experiences from a position of authority. We are the knowledge holder, so we dispense the knowledge we have. Yes, this is a place where the Bible seems to insist that it has the answers to who created everything. 

But shouldn’t it? Playing the game of pretend, imagine that it weren’t this particular religion. If I knew I had all the answers, and I wrote them down in a book, wouldn’t I say that I had all the answers? Of course I would. Why would I not? 

God, being our Father, would do as any parent would: tell us he knows what he knows (which is everything). Also being our Father, I cannot help but wonder what is left out of His knowledge for us. After all, when a child says, “Where do babies come from? (Where do I come from?)” we don’t usually go into too many details. I imagine the creation of the universe, while still an act of complete and utter love, had much more to do with astrophysics, chemistry, and biology than our biblical forefathers were ready to understand (than we still really understand). 

Thank you for reading! How did your meditation go? What were your thoughts? Please share in the comments below! 

This post is brought to you by my patrons on Patreon. If you enjoy this blog, please consider joining me there. 

The Scripture quotation of this post is taken from the Holman Christian Standard Bible. 


 Patreon Executive Producer: Cindy Horn

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